A Room of One's Own

Author(s): Virginia Woolf; Frances Spalding (Afterword by)

Adult Classics

A Room of One's Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on 24 October 1929, the essay was based on a series of lectures she delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women's colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. The essay examines whether women were capable of producing, and in fact free to produce work of the quality of William Shakespeare, addressing the limitations that past and present women writers face. It is generally seen as a feminist text, and is noted in its argument for both a literal and figural space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by patriarchy.Adeline Virginia Woolf (née Stephen; 25 January 1882 - 28 March 1941) was an English writer who is considered one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device. Born in an affluent household in Kensington, London, she attended the King's College London and was acquainted with the early reformers of women's higher education. Having been home-schooled for most part of her childhood, mostly in English classics and Victorian literature, Woolf began writing professionally in 1900.


Product Information

A beautiful collector's edition of Virginia Woolf's revolutionary essay.

Virginia Woolf was born in 1882, the youngest daughter of the Victorian writer Sir Leslie Stephen. She was educated at home with her sister, Vanessa, in a literary environment. The death of Woolf's mother in 1895 and her father in 1904 led to the first of the serious nervous breakdowns that would come to feature heavily in her life. Shortly afterwards she moved with her sister and two of her brothers to 46 Gordon Square, which was to be the first meeting place of the circle of writers and artists known as the Bloomsbury Group. In 1912 Virginia married Leonard Woolf, with whom she would later establish the Hogarth Press, and also published her first novel, The Voyage Out. It would be followed by eight others, including Mrs Dalloway (1925) and To the Lighthouse (1927), which together establish her position as one of the most important modernists of the twentieth century. Woolf committed suicide in 1941.

General Fields

  • : 9781509843183
  • : Pan Macmillan
  • : Collector's Library, The
  • : October 2017
  • : 15.00 cmmm X 9.40 cmmm
  • : United Kingdom
  • : October 2017
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : New Edition
  • : Hardback
  • : Hardback
  • : 152
  • : 152
  • : Virginia Woolf; Frances Spalding (Afterword by)
  • : Virginia Woolf; Frances Spalding (Afterword by)
  • : 823.912
  • : 823.912
  • : English
  • : English
  • : New Edition